Study

Why to choose Faculty of Science?

The Faculty of Science of Palacký University in Olomouc is a research-based faculty that offers Bachelor’s, Master’s, and Doctoral studies invarious branches of Mathematics and Computer Science, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Ecology, and Earth Sciences. Currently there are approximately the Faculty 3,600 students and 1,000 employees at the Faculty.

Palacký University is an inalienable part of Olomouc, which has been listed as one of Europe’s hidden treasures by the Lonely Planet guide. Olomouc with approximately 100,000 inhabitants deserves the label "university city", since there are more than 24,000 students living here during the academic year. The tradition of the second oldest University in the Czech Republic dates back to 1573. Nowadays it represents a modern educational and research institution offering a wide range of study fields at eight faculties.

Degree Programmes in English

Master Study Programmes

Standard follow-up Master study programmes last two years. Students are required to take courses and examinations, present seminars, annual progress reports, pursue research governed by respective supervisors. Results of the research are compiled in master thesis. Students prepare for the State Examination, which tests the range and quality of the student’s abilities in respective field of study and the potential to acquire and creatively implement the knowledge. After successful defense of the master thesis and passing the State Examination, the student will be awarded a Master´s Degree.

Doctoral Study Programmes

Standard Ph.D. study programmes last four years. Students are required to take courses and examinations, present seminars, annual progress reports, pursue research and publish their data in scientific journals according to their individual study plans governed by respective supervisors. Results of the research are compiled in Ph.D. thesis. Students prepare for the State Doctoral Examination, which tests the range and quality of the student's abilities in respective field of study and the potential to acquire and creatively implement the knowledge. After successful defense of the doctoral thesis and passing the State Doctoral Examination, the student will be awarded the degree Ph.D.

Fields of Study

Study Programme Applied Mathematics
Field of Study Applied Mathematics

Study Programme Biochemistry
Field of Study Biochemistry

Study Programme Biology
Fields of Study Botany - NOT OPEN Zoology, Molecular and Cell Biology - NOT OPEN Experimental Biology

Study Programme Chemistry
Fields of Study Analytical Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Nanomaterial Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry

Study Programme Computer Science
Fields of Study Computer Science

Study Programme Ecology and Environmental Protection
Field of Study Ecology

Study Programme Geography
Fields of Study Geoinformatics and Cartography, International Development Studies - NOT OPEN

Study Programme Geology
Field of Study Geological Sciences

Study Programme Mathematics
Fields of Study Algebra and Geometry, Mathematical Analysis

Study Programme Physics
Fields of Study Applied Physics, Biophysics, General Physics and Mathematical Physics - NOT OPEN, Optics and Optoelectronics, Nanotechnology

Thesis topics

Applied Mathematics

Field od Study Applied Mathematics

Regression models with complex structure
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Eva Fišerová, Ph.D.
Regression models are typically used to understand better the relationships between different dependent (target) and explanatory variables. The aim of the dissertation is the development of suitable statistical methods and algorithms mainly focused on statistical modelling when the variables are interrelated by complex functional relationships and have a complex variation structure. The emphasis will be given both on theoretical aspects concerning estimation, uncertainty and statistical inference, as well as practical implementation and computational feasibility.

Logratio methodology for high-dimensional data
Supervisor: Doc. RNDr. Karel Hron, Ph.D.
High-dimensional data are often characterized by their relative nature which needs to be taken into account for further statistical processing. Aim of the dissertation thesis is to adapt popular methods for high-dimensional data analysis within the logratio methodology for compositional data. Both theoretical developments and applications to real data are expected.

Biochemistry

Field of Study Biochemistry

Topic for Fischer stipend

Comparative study of the differentiation of crown-roots in rice (Oryza sativa) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) by an integrative approach
Supervisor: Prof. Pascal Gantet
Consultant: Dr. Véronique Bergougnoux-Fojtik
The root system of the monocots differs from those of dicots by its fibrous architecture characterized by the post-embryonic shoot-borne roots, called crown-roots (CRs). CR proliferation influence grain yield in water-limited conditions. Understanding the origin and genetic control of CR initiation will provide keys to develop crops adapted to different environmental constrains (mainly drought). The PhD proposal is organized into two main research activities: 1) Understanding the origin of CRs in barley and rice using classical histology, confocal microscopy 2) Functional characterization of barley orthologues of two transcription factors identified by a system biology approach in rice for their potential role in CR initiation.

Subcellular effects of bacterial and fungal elicitors on transgenic MAPK barley lines
Supervisor: Doc. Georgios Komis, Ph.D.
Our laboratory investigates the relation of the plant cytoskeleton with signaling processes during plant – microbe interactions of barley. We maintain transgenic barley lines with manipulated content of three mitogen activated protein kinases (HvMPK1, HvMPK5 and HvMPK6) as those are the strongest responsive to infection by Puccinia sp. The purpose of the proposed PhD topic is to describe alterations of barley microtubule and actin systems after elicitation with bacterial or fungal elicitors including flg22 (flagellin fragment), elf18 (peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor) and chitin (elicitor from fungal cell walls) and connect them to signaling processes by using the transgenic barley lines with modified MPK signaling.

Biology

Field of Study Experimental Biology

Topic for Fischer stipend

Role of blue light photoreceptors in plant sensitivity to abiotic stress
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Martin Fellner, Ph.D.
The project deals with problems how blue light influence responses of plants to tolerate abiotic stress (salt, osmotic, water, or temperature stress). We previously revealed that phototropin mutants in Arabidopsis are highly tolerant to osmotic stress. Similarly, tomato mutant 7B-1 affected in phototropin signaling pathway shows blue light-specific tolerance to salt and osmotic stress. The aim of the project is to find out mechanisms by which blue light and its specific receptors, such as phototropins and cryptochromes, are involved in plant responses to various abiotic stresses. To investigate link between blue light and stress signaling, student will be responsible for physiological, molecular and biochemical experiments on various mutants with defects in blue light perception.

Field of Study Zoology

All topics for Fischer stipend

Evolution of mimicry in multi-species communities
Supervisor: Prof. Ing. Ladislav Bocák, Ph.D.
Multiple local patterns, intraspecific polymorphism and a species with their own aposematic pattern should not persist in mutualistic Müllerian mimetic systems due to the purifying and frequency-dependent selection. The dated molecular phylogenies can be used for the study of the evolution of aposematic patterns in a historical context. The student will test the working hypotheses that unprofitable prey gradually enhance their aposematic signal and that multi-pattern communities evolve through advergence and gradual expansion. The mechanism responsible for such evolution will be hypothesized. The projects include laboratory work, phylogenetic sequence analyses, reconstruction of ancestral states and some taxonomic studies. The laboratory provides consumables, material, and equipment necessary for the completion of the project.
The applicant is welcome to apply for the Fischer Scholarship

Phylogenomics of the family Lycidae: the evolution of ontogenetic modifications
Supervisor: Prof. Ing. Ladislav Bocák, Ph.D.
The nextgen sequencing and Sanger-era data will be employed for the construction of the densely sampled phylogeny of net-winged beetles Lycidae. The student will produce genomic data and analyze transcriptomes and genomes to assemble the backbone for the family-level phylogeny of the group. The lineages with modified ontogeny will be set in the phylogenetic context and their origin will be dated. Further, the ancestral areas will be identified and the diversification rates will be estimated for neotenic and fully metamorphosed monophyletic groups.  The project includes laboratory work, phylogenetic analyses using genomes and transcriptoms, curation of Sanger-era data, the inference of all-evidence phylogenies, reconstruction of ancestral states and a limited number of taxonomic studies. The laboratory provides consumables, material, and equipment necessary for the completion of the project.
The applicant is welcome to apply for the Fischer Scholarship

Diversification and the evolution of species coexistence
Supervisor: Doc. Mgr. Vladimír Remeš, Ph.D.
Diversifying clades fill ecological space and due to secondary sympatry build-up local diversity. This process depends on local and regional functional diversity of this clade. The student will use large-scale data from literature, citizen science projects, museums, and fieldwork to reveal ecological and behavioral mechanisms allowing coexistence in secondary sympatry and subsequent build-up of species diversity.

Ecology and Environmental Protection

Field of Study Ecology

Population ecology and conservation of the common hamster
Supervisor: prof. MVDr. Emil Tkadlec, CSc.

Personality in soil invertebrates
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Ivan H. Tuf, Ph.D.

CO2 and CH4 emissions from small floodplain pools
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Martin Rulík, Ph.D.

Soil quality indicators in agroecosystems
Supervisor: prof. Dr. Ing. Bořivoj Šarapatka, CSc.

Effect of land use change on degradation by salinization
Supervisor: prof. Dr. Ing. Bořivoj Šarapatka, CSc.

Phylogeny and taxonomy of Curculigo (Hypoxidaceae) in Borneo
Supervisor: RNDr. Martin Dančák, Ph.D.

Physics

Field of Study Applied Physics

All topics for Fischer stipend

Analysis of cosmic ray events at the highest energy
Supervisor: prof. Miroslav Hrabovský, DrSc.
Consultants: RNDr. Petr Trávníček, Ph.D., Ing. Jakub Vícha
Pierre Auger Observatory is the largest experimental apparatus in the field of astroparticle physics. Particles with energies larger than that of the LHC beams are detected by the array covering 3000 square kilometres in the Argentinian pampa. These cosmic particles originate in yet unknown sources in the Universe. The Aim of the Observatory is to measure the energy spectrum, direction of the incoming particles and answer the question about  their chemical composition.
New analysis techniques at the Observatory will be developed by the student as well as new emerging detection techniques of cosmic rays will be investigated.

Optical detecting systems for cosmic radiation – selected questions 
Supervisor: prof. Miroslav Hrabovský, DrSc.
The topic is concentrated on the study of current optical detectors of cosmic radiation, participation in some of current international scientific projects of cosmic-ray research and participation at the research of new particular types of optical detectors of cosmic radiation, including participation in the scientific part of a related international collaboration.

Quantum and classical machine learning for quantum information protocols
Supervisor: doc. Mgr. Karel Lemr, Ph.D.
Within the scope of this topic the student will combine two modern research fields: machine learning algorithms and quantum information processing. Both purely theoretical and experimental approaches are possible, and the specific studied problems will reflect this choice.

Analysis of characteristics of parametric down-conversion 
Supervisors: doc. RNDr. Ondřej Haderka, Ph.D., doc. RNDr. Jan Peřina, Ph.D.
Simulation and testing of spontaneous parametric down-conversion, correlation measurement using photon-counting techniques as well as by classical intensity measurement.

Photocount statistics and its measurement in nonlinear optical processes
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Jan Peřina, Ph.D.
Theoretical models of photocount statistics arising in different nonlinear optical processes will be studied. Special attention will be paid to parametric processes. Characteristics of the obtained fields will be discussed with respect to measurement.

Photon-pair generation in metal-dielectric photonic structures
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Jan Peřina, Ph.D.
Properties of photon pairs in metal-dielectric layers will be studied, especially spectral and timing characteristics and quantum correlations of the photons in a pair. Special attention will be devoted to intense generation of pairs in metal layers.

Characteristics of parametric processes in nonlinear periodically-poled media
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Jan Soubusta, Ph.D.
Space beam properties. Study of efficiency of various processes. Optimization of generation of frequency down-conversion.

Quantum information processing with correlated photon pairs
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Jan Soubusta, Ph.D.
Arrangement, processing and detection of special light states of single photon level. An interference of the second and fourth order is utilized in the experiments

Testing modern materials using optical spectroscopic methods
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Jan Soubusta, Ph.D.
Measurement of absorbance, fluorescent and time-resolved fluorescent spectra of carbon, metal and metal-oxide nanostructures. Development of appropriate methods.

Influence of deposition conditions on the physical properties of thin layers on optical elements
Supervisor: Mgr. Libor Nožka, Ph.D.
The topic of Ph.D. work deals with study of characteristics of thin protective layers made of SiO2, TiO2, and HfO2 deposited onto optics elements. A deep description of these characteristics as a function of deposition process settings is the main goal. Following properties are of the main interest: structure of deposited layers, degree of crystallization, hardness and resistance to abrasion, transmittance in UV/VIS region etc. An impact of the annealing in a protective atmosphere on layers quality is another goal of the research.

Analysis of cosmic gamma ray events in the CTA experiment
Supervisor: RNDr. Karel Černý, Ph.D.
The Cherenkov Telescope Array Observatory (CTAO or CTA) is going to be the largest and technically most advanced ground-based  facility for detection of high-energy cosmic gamma rays. CTA will be located at both the southern and norther hemisphere. Both locations will be equipped with three types of telescopes covering three ranges of energies of the incoming gamma photons. The ultimate sensitivity will span energies from 20 GeV to 100 TeV. The detection principle is based on detection of Cherenkov light in the telescopes generated by charged particles traversing a medium with a speed greater than the actual speed of light in the given medium, i.e. in atmosphere. The charged particles are created in cascades of interactions whose onset is the primary interaction of the incoming gamma photon with atoms in the atmosphere. The envisaged work is supposed to cover the tasks of analysis and interpretation of the measured data. The primary task of CTA is to measure the energy spectrum and distribution sources of the gamma photons.

The fluorescence telescope for future FAST telescope array.
Supervisor: Mgr. Dušan Mandát, Ph.D.
Consultants: Mgr. Miroslav Pech, Ph.D., Dr. Toshihiro Fujii
The Fluorescence detector Array of Single-pixel Telescopes (FAST) is an R&D project devoted to the development of a low-cost fluorescence detector telescope, which could provide inexpensive hybrid coverage for existing experiments, such as the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array experiment, and serve as a proof-of-concept for future large-scale Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) observations. The aim of this work will be focused on the analysis of data from the current FAST prototypes, optical simulations, and future giant array optimization.

Shape optimization of materials
Supervisor: Doc. Ing. Luděk Bartoněk, Ph.D.
The aim is practical application of numerical modeling of physical phenomena and optimization methods. An example may be profile optimization based on numerical flow modeling, or component design (for a particular application) with an optimum weight / strength ratio and available on a 3D printer. The main issues include:
Numerical modeling of phenomena relevant to the problem under consideration.
-  Formulation of criteria ("pricing functions") for optimization.
-  Automate the numerical modeling process and evaluate the results (such as using Python).
-  Linking with the selected optimization code. In solving practically oriented problems, there is usually a need for more (conflicting) criteria, such as weight versus strength. It is therefore necessary to master the concept of multi-criteria optimization. Ideally, optimization results should be verified. E.g. in the case of 3D printing, this may be a strength test.

Field of Study Biophysics

All topics for Fischer stipend

Ultra-weak photon emission in plant and animal cells
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Pavel Pospíšil, Ph.D.
Ultra-weak photon emission originates from oxidative metabolic processes in microbial, plant and animal cells. Electronically excited species (triplet excited carbonyls and singlet oxygen) formed during the oxidative metabolic processes are responsible for the ultra-weak photon emission. Role of reactive oxygen species in oxidation of lipids and proteins will be studied in plant and animal cells.

Trimetallic nanoclusters: syntheses, physico-chemical and biological properties
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Karolína Machalová Šišková, Ph.D.
Similarly as bimetallic nanoclusters, trimetallic nanoclusters are included in composite nanomaterials consisting of a biocompatible organic component and a functional inorganic component. In comparison with bimetallic nanoclusters, the investigation of trimetallic nanoclusters is just at the very beginning. The application of trimetallic nanoclusters is expected, for instance, in imaging based on dual properties of these clusters (e.g. optical and magnetic), in catalysis etc. The aim of this PhD thesis is the development of new experimentally prepared trimetallic nanoclusters, their characterization and testing of their interactions with cells; the last mentioned in collaboration with a well-known scientific institute in Prague.

Field of Study Nanotechnology

All topics for Fischer stipend

Quantum and classical machine learning for quantum information protocols
Supervisor: doc. Mgr. Karel Lemr, Ph.D.
Within the scope of this topic the student will combine two modern research fields: machine learning algorithms and quantum information processing. Both purely theoretical and experimental approaches are possible, and the specific studied problems will reflect this choice.

Analysis of characteristics of parametric down-conversion 
Supervisors: doc. RNDr. Ondřej Haderka, Ph.D., doc. RNDr. Jan Peřina, Ph.D.
Simulation and testing of spontaneous parametric down-conversion, correlation measurement using photon-counting techniques as well as by classical intensity measurement.

Photocount statistics and its measurement in nonlinear optical processes
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Jan Peřina, Ph.D.
Theoretical models of photocount statistics arising in different nonlinear optical processes will be studied. Special attention will be paid to parametric processes. Characteristics of the obtained fields will be discussed with respect to measurement.

Photon-pair generation in metal-dielectric photonic structures
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Jan Peřina, Ph.D.
Properties of photon pairs in metal-dielectric layers will be studied, especially spectral and timing characteristics and quantum correlations of the photons in a pair. Special attention will be devoted to intense generation of pairs in metal layers.

Characteristics of parametric processes in nonlinear periodically-poled media
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Jan Soubusta, Ph.D.
Space beam properties. Study of efficiency of various processes. Optimization of generation of frequency down-conversion.

Quantum information processing with correlated photon pairs
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Jan Soubusta, Ph.D.
Arrangement, processing and detection of special light states of single photon level. An interference of the second and fourth order is utilized in the experiments

Testing modern materials using optical spectroscopic methods
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Jan Soubusta, Ph.D.
Measurement of absorbance, fluorescent and time-resolved fluorescent spectra of carbon, metal and metal-oxide nanostructures. Development of appropriate methods.

Influence of deposition conditions on the physical properties of thin layers on optical elements
Supervisor: Mgr. Libor Nožka, Ph.D.
The topic of Ph.D. work deals with study of characteristics of thin protective layers made of SiO2, TiO2, and HfO2 deposited onto optics elements. A deep description of these characteristics as a function of deposition process settings is the main goal. Following properties are of the main interest: structure of deposited layers, degree of crystallization, hardness and resistance to abrasion, transmittance in UV/VIS region etc. An impact of the annealing in a protective atmosphere on layers quality is another goal of the research.

Formation of crystalline and nanocrystalline materials
Supervisor: Mgr. Vít Procházka, Ph.D.
Iron belongs to the most abundant elements on the Earth, therefore understanding of the formation of iron based compounds is important for its utilization in many applications. This works aim to the formation of iron compounds with an attention to the theoretical description.
These materials can be formed in many processes, e.g. chemical reactions, crystallization, recrystallization, diffusion etc. They can be studied by a number of analytical methods including those suitable for in-situ experiments. This work focuses especially on the application of x-ray powder diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy where the combining of these techniques offers important information on both local arrangement and arrangement on the long distance.

Field of Study Optics and Optoelectronics

All topics for Fischer stipend

Nonliear quantum metrology
Supervisor: Doc. Mgr. Petr Marek, Ph.D.
Quantum metrology aims to find an unknown value of a classical quantity by probing the system by a quantum probe. The probe is prepared in a well-defined quantum state and  measured by suitable quantum measurement. For nonlinear metrology we shall investigate what limits we can reach by considering the nonlinear quantum states and measurements made accessible by the latest experimental advances.

Multi-user quantum communication
Supervisor: Vladyslav Usenko, Ph.D.
The work will be focused on the development and analysis of applicability of quantum communication protocols between multiple users using quantum states of light. Various communication scenarios will be studied with the aim of establishing multi-partite or joint quantum communication. Methods for routing of quantum information will be developed. Practical aspects, such as role of losses and noise in quantum channels will be studied in relevant communication scenarios and methods aimed at improving robustness of the multi-user protocols will be suggested.

Control of nonclassical light emission from trapped ion strings
Supervisor: Mgr. Lukáš Slodička, Ph.D.
This thesis will focus on the development of nonclassical light source which will combine several unique properties of trapped ions, in particular the purity of the single photon emission, the possibility of the deterministic control of their collective internal states, and the sub-wavelength localization. The thesis will include realization of novel ion trapping apparatus which will allow to use the deterministic control of internal states of trapped ions for the efficient control of direction and collection efficiency of the emitted fluorescence. The proposed experimental setup would represent a feasible and broadly applicable architecture for controlling the light emission from atoms in free space applicable for construction of quantum communication networks and fundamental tests of atom light interaction.

Geography

Field of Study Geoinformatics and Cartography

All topics for Fischer stipend

Analysis of preferences of web map users
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Vít Voženílek, CSc.
Research focuses on specific geovisual browsing patterns which can be identified during the use of web maps. Exploring and visualizing of geobrowsing behaviour will be studied systematically. Multiple case studies will include various approaches to on-screen navigation behaviour with respects to navigational aids and the multimedia information provided. The research also includes user preferences of satellite views. Specific attention will be devoted to the technical solution to obtaining a software application to analyse captured data sequences.

Identification of cartographic styles based on a cartosemiotic analysis
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Vít Voženílek, CSc.
Cartographic style refers to a systematic approach that can be applicable to classification and further stylistic analysis. The research will outline the main parameters that can be used to determine, evaluate and implement a consistent map style. The objective is to propose a structured framework for the Cartographic style refers to a systematic approach that can be applicable to classification and further stylistic analysis. The research will outline the main parameters that can be used to determine, evaluate and implement a consistent map style. The objective is to propose a structured framework for the identification of any cartographic styles based on a cartosemiotic analysis of many modern printed and electronic thematic maps.

Processing of spatial data by data mining
Supervisor: doc. Ing. Zdena Dobešová, Ph.D.
Methods of data mining and artificial intelligence like clustering, similarity search or association rules discovered in spatial data new knowledge and help predict the behaviour in space and time. The research and application of classic machine learning algorithms on the spatial-temporal data is a new approach how research geographically located data. Also, the tasks of spatial disaggregation are essential. The aim of work is a description, selection and application of data mining methods for suitable spatial data.

Visual programming for spatial data processing
Supervisor: doc. Ing. Zdena Dobešová, Ph.D.
Visual programming in GIS is a straightforward method of designing spatial data processing workflows in a graphical form.  The aim of work is research of cognition and functional aspects of visual languages. Improvements of graphical notation and functionality of visual languages have the potential for broader usability of workflows in GIS.

Geology

Field of Study Geological Sciences

All topics for Fischer stipend

Dam reservoirs and ponds as archives of historical anthropogenic contamination in Upper Silesia urban agglomeration (Czechia, Poland)
Supervisor: Prof. Mgr. Ondřej Bábek Dr.
Sedimentary infills of dammed reservoirs represent an important environmental and economic issue due to the limited life time of reservoirs, costs related to dredging and further management of contaminated reservoir sediments. Simple prediction models of reservoir infill are difficult to achieve due to a high number of factors that influence the sediment accumulation rates. Site-specific data such as erosion rates in the river catchment, grain size characteristics of the sediment load and the bottom morphology are usually needed in such an effort while, in general, little is known about the depositional architecture of reservoir lakes sediments.
Dam reservoirs and historical ponds in the urban agglomeration of Ostrava and surrounding cities in Upper Silesia in the Odra River catchment offer a unique case to study the long-term effects of pollutant accumulation in a highly industrial landscape subject to long-term anthropogenic pollution. This project will focus on quantitative stratigraphic analysis and inorganic and organic geochemistry of sediment cores from water reservoirs along the Odra River in Czechia (Bezruč, Kukla, Heřmanický r., Vrbické j., Kališovo j.) and Poland (Roszków, Staw Syrinski, Babiczak). The project´s aim will be deciphering history of anthropogenic contamination, separating of background geochemical signals from anthropogenic signals and deciphering the spatial dispersal of pollutants in the lakes and on the catchment scale.
The project will rely on bathymetric mapping of reservoir bottom, geophysical imaging of sediment architecture using ground penetrating radar (GPR) a sub-bottom profiler, drilling of sediment cores and analysis of sediment grain size, inorganic and organic geochemistry and analysis of sediment accumulation rates using 137Cs dating. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals (WoS).
Suitable candidates typically have a MSc. degree in geology / physical geography with excellent results and previous experience with work in the field (Bc., MSc. thesis in sedimentary geology or geomorphology). Good written and spoken English is required. Previous experience with scientific publishing is advantage.

Geochemistry and palaeoclimatologic significance Devonian red pelagic facies of the Prague Basin and Montagne Noire, France
Supervisor: Prof. Mgr. Ondřej Bábek Dr.
Red pelagic carbonates are distinct marine facies, which form under oligotrophic and well-oxygenated sea-bottom conditions and/or due to activity of iron oxidizing bacteria. The mechanism of their deposition is not well-understood. Since they commonly occur during warm greenhouse periods of the Phanerozoic (Devonian, Jurassic, Cretaceous), they can be considered as time-specific facies linked to marine redox conditions, similarly as black shales. This project will be focused on the red carbonates and shales of early and late Devonian age, exposed in the Prague Basin (Reporyje limestone, Daleje shale, Suchomosty limestone) and in Montagne Noire and French Pyrenees (France). Through analyses of stratigraphic context, carbonate petrology (thin sections), mineralogy of Fe oxyhydroxides, element geochemistry and microgeochemistry (laser-ablation ICP-MS, electron microprobe) and stable isotopes this project will interpret the redox conditions, organic productivity and presence or absence of microbial activity as possible controls of the red carbonate deposition. The principal aim is to make an insight into the origin and paleoclimatological context of the red carbonate facies in the Palaeozoic. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals (WoS).
Suitable candidates typically have a MSc. degree in geology / physical geography with excellent results and previous experience with work in the field (Bc., MSc. thesis in sedimentary geology or geochemistry). Good written and spoken English is required. Previous experience with scientific publishing is advantage.

Sequence-stratigraphic framework and hydrocarbon potential of stylolite distribution in Upper Cretaceous Kometan Formation, western Zagros, Iraqi Kurdistan
Supervisor: Prof. Mgr. Ondřej Bábek Dr.
The Kometan Formation (Turonian – Campanian), which is a prospective carbonate reservoir for oil and gas of northern Iraq, is composed of fractured, fine-grained, foraminifer-rich carbonate sediments deposited in shallow-water shelf and open marine to pelagic settings. Depositional facies of the formation are arranged into three stratigraphic units with variable lithology and siliciclastic admixture as indicated by gamma-ray logs. Porosity and permeability are controlled mainly by fracture distribution and modified by pressure dissolution features, particularly stylolites, which may represent potential conduits for hydrocarbon migration.
The content of detrital minerals in the carbonate successions is largely controlled by the extent of terrestrial input into marine realm versus biologic carbonate production, both being strongly affected by relative sea-level fluctuations and climate. Pressure dissolution may show preferential occurrence at sequence-stratigraphic surfaces with high- or contrasting detrital contents, such as the maximum flooding surface, maximum regression surface or basal surface of forced regression. Thus, primary signals including sea-level changes may affect the reservoir quality.
The aim of this project is to: (i) map the distribution of stylolites in outcrop sections of the Kometan Formation in the High-Folded Zone of western Zagros, Iraqi Kurdistan (Dokan and Sulaimani areas); (ii) link the distribution of stylolites to the sequence stratigraphic framework based on facies and microfacies analysis, outcrop gamma-ray- and magnetic susceptibility logging; (iii) correlate the outcrop data with wire-line logging data (gamma-ray, caliper, neutron, density, image log, ...) from the Taq Taq, Kikruk and related oil-fields of the Low-Folded Zone; and (iv) assess the potential role of stylolites as hydrocarbon conduits based on a detailed petrologic study of thin sections.
The project will combine outcrop data collection with microscopic techniques, bulk elements geochemistry, petrophysics a microchemistry (electron microprobe). The project will be based on instrumental equipment and facilities of the Department of Geology, UP Olomouc (gamma-ray spectrometer, laboratory kappa-bridge, optical, CL- and fluorescence microscopes, energy-dispersive and wave-dispersive XRF analysis of bulk sediment samples, and electron microprobe analyses of key diagenetic phases with EDX, WDX analysis).
The results will be published in internationally renowned scientific journals.
Project funding: The project´s operational funding will be partly covered by the Internal Grant Agency of the UP and partly from industry sources in the Iraqi Kurdistan.

Chemistry

Field of Study Analytical Chemistry

All topics for Fischer stipend

Separation of physiologically active compounds in plant materials using electrochemical detection
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. David Jirovský, Ph.D.

Miniaturized amperometric detection systems and their utilization in flow measurement techniques
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. David Jirovský, Ph.D.

3D printing in microfluidics
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Jan Petr, Ph.D.

Development and application of microfluidic devices in analytical chemistry
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Petr Fryčák, Ph.D.

Study of transport processes in desorption electrospray techniques
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Petr Fryčák, Ph.D.

Speciation elemental analysis in biological and clinical materials by atomic spectrometry methods
Supervisor: doc. Ing. David Milde, Ph.D.

Possibilities of a micromaipulation for preparation of sample for chemical analysis
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Petr Bednář, Ph.D.

Development of new analytical procedures for study of seed dormancy
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Petr Bednář, Ph.D.

New methods for chemical analysis in archaelogy
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Petr Bednář, Ph.D.

Identification of binders in historical artworks
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Karel Lemr, Ph.D.

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Metabolomics
Supervisor: prof. Ing. Vladimír Havlíček, Dr.

Field of Study Inorganic Chemistry

Coordination compounds showing the magnetic bi- or multistability – materials for new generation of memory devices
Supervisor: doc. Ing. Ivan Šalitroš, Ph.D.
Proposed PhD project is oriented on the synthesis and characterization of magnetically active transition metal and/or lanthanide complexes showing specific magnetic phenomena like spin crossover effect, single molecule magnetism or single chain magnetism. Such coordination compounds exhibit magnetic bi- or multistability and in this sense are very attractive from the application point of view. Possible technological utilization might be in the case of high capacity memory devices, display technologies, spintronics, contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging etc.

Photomagnetically active coordination compounds
Supervisor: doc. Ing. Radovan Herchel, Ph.D.
Proposed PhD project is oriented on the synthesis and characterization of ligand susceptible to external stimuli – light, which will trigger structural changes and hence magnetic properties of the coordination compounds comprising such ligands.

Field of Study Physical Chemistry

All topics for Fischer stipend

Role of biomembranes and membrane associated proteins in transport and biotransformation of drugs
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Michal Otyepka, Ph.D. ; Dr. Patrick Trouillas
Biomembranes separate cell from external environment and make walls of cellular compartments. The biomembranes are made of lipid bilayer, which houses also many proteins. The vast majority of drugs interacts with molecular targets, which ale localized inside cells and they have to pass across the biomembranes to reach their targets via active or passive transport. Without any doubt, the biomembranes make an important biological playground, where many biologically relevant processes occur. Despite importance of these processes, many details of active and passive transport as well as biotransformation of drugs remain elusive. The main aim of this project is to understand mechanism of active transport and role of polymorphism on effectivity of active transport. Methods of theoretical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations will be utilized. The project can be solved also in the framework of a double-degree PhD with University of Limoges in France.

Understanding biology at an atomic resolution
Supervisor: Dr. Patrick Trouillas
Interaction of new materials and new chemical derivatives with biological systems is of crucial importance in many research fields related to healthcare. The today and tomorrow’s challenges lie in rationalization of these interactions with an atomistic resolution. The gamut of theoretical chemistry methods allows achievement of that outcome, with increasingly precise accuracy. We propose a series of research topics focusing on noncovalent interaction between π-conjugated systems, interaction with lipid bilayers membranes and interactions with proteins

Structure and Dynamics of RNA
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Jiří Šponer, DrSc.
The topic of the thesis will be studies of selected RNA molecules (ribosomal RNA motifs, protein-RNA complexes, ribozymes, riboswitches, selected from systems presently studied in our laboratory as well as in collaborating laboratories) using methods of classical molecular dynamics simulations, bioinformatics and quantum-chemistry. RNA presently belongs to the most widely studied biomolecules. Functional RNA molecules are fascinating 3D architectures and computational chemistry is one of the basic tools in their characterization, as can be documented also by number of our preceding studies in the field (see, e.g., the WOS database). Computer simulations can obtain new information for example about the role of noncanonical base pairs in RNA structure and evolution, and can substantially complement information obtained by X-ray crystallography, NMR and bioinformatics. The work may include either studies of specific systems or tasks oriented more towards method testing and development. We collaborate with a number of experienced laboratories across the world, including F.H.T. Allain, G. Bussi, N.B. Leontis, N.G. Walter, M. Nowotny, and others.

Origin of Life Theory – Studies of Prebiotic Chemical Reactions
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Jiří Šponer, DrSc.
The topic of the thesis will be origin of life theory, which is a complex research area ranging from the evolution of planetary systems through prebiotic synthesis of basic components of the living materials up to simple protocells. Theoretical quantum-chemical (QM) methods can be efficiently applied to studies of prebiotic chemical reactions. The main advantage of QM methods is their capability to describe processes which in some cases cannot be fully satisfactorily understood by means of experiments. Presently, we are involved in studies related for example to the formamide pathway to the origin of life, non-templated synthesis of the first RNAs from the cyclic nucleotides, role of photochemical processes in prebiotic chemistry, QM molecular dynamics simulations, high energy impact chemistry and some other topics. The dissertation is suitable for students who are interested in application of modern QM methods and have a feeling for chemical reactions. Because it is a very difficult topic, specific research goal can be proposed only after careful assessment of the capabilities of the applicant. We closely collaborate with other experimental and theoretical laboratories, e.g. E. Di Mauro, R. Salladino, M. Ferus, M. Saitta, J.D. Sutherland and some others.

Multiscale Modeling of Nucleic Acids
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Jiří Šponer, DrSc.
Nucleic acids (RNA and DNA) belong to the most important biomacromolecules. Studies of structure and dynamics of nucleic acids represent an important task of modern life sciences. Due to fast development of hardware and software, computational and theoretical approaches are frequently used in nucleic acids studies and represent a respected counterpart of experimental techniques. This PhD project will be based on integrated interdisciplinary utilization of a broad spectrum of computational methods (multi-scale modelling) ranging from state-of-the-art quantum-chemical (QM) approaches through modern explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods up to bioinformatics. Cooperation with established experimental laboratories will provide necessary experimental feedback. State-of-the-art computational facilities are available not only in our laboratory but also in cooperating laboratories abroad. The exact topic will be specified based on the discussion with the applicant and her/his scientific interests and capabilities. Currently available specific themes include for example multiscale studies of protein-RNA complexes, RNA catalysis, structural dynamics and folding of quadruplex DNA and large-scale QM studies of complete nucleic acids building blocks.

Development of the enhanced sampling techniques for biomolecules
Supervisor: doc. Mgr. Pavel Banáš, Ph.D.
This topic will be focused on the development of the methods allowing efficient sampling of the enormous conformational space of the biomolecules. The standard simulation techniques are typically able to sample only small part of rather complex conformational space of proteins and nucleic acids (RNA and DNA) or they offer extending the sampling in price of loosing the all-atom resolution. The new approaches combining all-atom and coarse-grained techniques in the multi-scale description of biomolecules might bring important insight into many physiological processes such as folding of biomolecules or might be used for the prediction of the biomolecular structures. The rapid development of the hardware might be stimulating for the simultaneous development of the simulation techniques allowing even more efficient sampling of the conformational space. We collaborate with several groups across the world focusing on biomolecular simulations and the development of simulation technique (G. Bussi – Trieste Italy, R. Best – Bethesda, USA) or experimental studies of biomolecular structure and dynamics (N.G.Walter – Ann Arbor, USA, A. Ke – Ithaca, USA).

Development of empirical potentials for nucleic acid simulations
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Petr Jurečka, Ph.D.
The aim of this work is development of new empirical potentials for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nucleic acids. Interest in simulations of nucleic acids has sharply increased over the past few years, partly due to new discoveries in the area of biological functions of non-coding RNA molecules in organism. Since experiment cannot describe all aspects of nucleic acids behavior, especially atomistic detail over short time scales, interest in theoretical modeling by molecular dynamics simulations is constantly growing. MD simulations rely on empirical potentials, which determine quality and reliability of modeling results. Unfortunately, potentials for nucleic acids are not as well studied as for instance those developed earlier for modeling of proteins. Our goal is to design improved empirical potentials and their testing on a wide range of biologically interesting RNA and DNA motifs, focusing on recently published X-ray and NMR structures. We collaborate with renowned world laboratories in Barcelona, Spain (F. J. Luque) or Salt Lake City, USA (T. E. Cheatham).

Molecular photoswitches
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Miroslav Medveď, PhD.
Molecular photoswitches are photo-responsive molecular systems that can reversibly be converted with ELM radiation between two states with different photochemical and physicochemical properties. The most prominent families of photoswitches include azobenzenes, stilbenes, spiropyrans/merocyanines, diarylethenes and hemithioindigo photoswitches, which take advantage from either a cis-trans double-bond photoisomerization or a photoactivated cyclization/ring opening reaction. In spite of a large variety of pohotoswitching systems, especially for biological applications, the available toolbox of switches that operate in the visible light region with large separation of absorption spectra of the photo-isomers is very limited. In this context, one of the promising groups of compounds involves donor-acceptor Stenhouse aducts (DASAs) that have been recently described by Read de Alaniz and co-workers [J. Org. Chem., 2014, 79, 11316-11329] and intensively studied by state-of-the-art spectroscopic and computational approaches [e.g. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2017, 139, 15596−15599; Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2018, 57, 8063 –8068]. Following the studies of the first and second generation of DASA compounds, the aim of the PhD project is to employ the state-of-the-art TDDFT/DFT methods, wavefunction based methods (CC2, CASSCF/CASPT2, DMRG-CASPT2, …) and excited-state dynamics approaches to study the photoswitching reaction mechanisms and photochemistry of molecular photoswitches designed in collaboration with world-renowned experimental groups. 

Computer-aided drug design based on quantum mechanical calculations
Supervisor: prof. Ing. Pavel Hobza, DrSc., FRSC
Computer-aided drug design represents new attractive area at the border of physical chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacy. Computer screening of existing databases allows to reduce time consuming synthesis and testing of new potential drugs. Theoretical treatment also allow to suggest modification of existing drugs and prediction of their potency. In our laboratory we developed new startegy for calculation of binding free energy of drugs with proteins which is based on quantum chemical approach. The accuarcy of this technique is much higher than that based on existing approaches and the method was successfuly used for several protein - ligand complexes. Finally, we constructed new scoring function based again on quantum mechanical approach and first results show that the function clearly outperforms all existing scoring functions.

Interactions of small molecules with lipid membranes
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Karel Berka, Ph.D.
Small molecules interact with lipid bilayers in multiple ways – adsorption, accumulation, penetration, etc. Membranes are also sensitive to interacting molecules and their concentrations. Interacting molecules can cause increased/decreased membrane undulation movements, change membrane phase behavior, cause membrane pore generation or dissolve membrane completely. Description of such complex behavior and its possible applications (e.g. in drug delivery) requires data mining from literature and bio- and cheminformatic databases as well as simulation approaches. Goal of the project is the analysis of small molecule interactions with membranes and their modulation by adaptation of compounds and membrane composition. We collaborate with several groups across the world, e.g. Uppsala Universitet (P. Larsson, P. Hanson), Comenius University Bratislava (P. Balgavy), Universite de Limoges (P. Trouillas) or Inserm (F. Di Meo)

Field of Study Organic Chemistry

All topics for Fischer stipend

Design and synthesis of novel heterocyclic compounds with potent antimicrobial activity
Supervisor: RNDr. Lucie Brulíková, Ph.D.
The aim of this work is design and synthesis of novel heterocyclic compounds with potent biological activity, antimicrobial in particular. Set of compounds will be synthesized employing of solution phase and/or solid phase synthetic approach. Final compounds will be further modified according to biological activity testing. Alternatively, new pharmacophore will be investigated.

Nitrogen-Containing Heterocyclic Compounds: Synthesis, Method Development, Study of Physical-Chemical Properties and Reactivity
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Petr Cankař, Ph.D.
The PhD thesis will be focused on the synthesis of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds with the potential biological relevance or the development of novel synthetic methods. The prepared compounds will be studied with regard to physical-chemical properties, reactivity, and potential biological activity.

Preparation of new semisynthetic triterpenes and study of their biological properties
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Milan Urban, Ph.D.
This thesis will be focused on the synthesis of new bioactive natural compounds - triterpenes in order to improve their antitumor activity and pharmacological properties. The triterpenoid skeleton of lupane, oleanane, ursane or friedeline will be mostly modified by the introduction of heterocycle moieties, secoderivatives will be prepared as well as more oxidized terpenic structures and conjugates with other molecules of interest. The active compounds will then be used for the evaluation of their mechanism of action, prodrugs will be investigated in order to improve their solubility and bioavailability

Study of new fluorescent systems for applications in molecular electronics and chemical biology
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Jan Hlaváč, Ph.D.
Molecular electronics is the field of study focused on research of chemical compounds able to substitute various electronic components.  The main motivation in this research is miniaturization of electronic devices. Although number of chemical compounds has been already described as part of molecular gates operated by change of chemical surrounding and their combination resulted in more complicated circuits, practical applications are very limited from many reasons. One of the most developed application areas is chemical biology, where one of the main aims is the precise detection of significant markers typical for relevant metabolic changes or visualization of targeted drug delivery and releasing. This topic will be focused on development of quite new molecular electronic components or significant improvement of the already described ones. Application of these molecular electronic devices will be oriented to chemical biology with aim to detect more various analytes (markers) with use of one system. Multianalytical systems will be studied also without a necessity of their molecular electronics nature.

Field of Study Nanomaterial Chemistry

All topics for Fischer stipend

Synthesis, characterization and applications of new graphene derivatives
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Michal Otyepka, Ph.D.
Graphene is without any doubt an extraordinary material. Some of its properties (hydrophobicity, zero band-gap, low chemical reactivity), however, limit its application potential, e.g., in electronics and biosensing. We seek for new preparation routes for tailored graphene modifications. The modification can be achieved via covalent as well as noncovalent approaches (Chem. Rev., 112(11), 6156-6214, 2012). The framework topic focuses on development of alternative routes for synthesis of graphene derivatives, on understanding of mechanism of chemistries of carbon 2D materials and understanding of physical-chemical properties of graphene derivatives. The aims will be fulfilled via experimental (synthesis, characterization via e.g., HRTEM, SEM, AFM, XPS, and sensing, and (electro)catalytic applications) or computational (DFT, advanced DFT and post-HF) methods and simulation (all-atom and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations) techniques. The particular topics will be focused on design, synthesis, and characterization of new graphene derivatives with tailored properties (e.g., magnetic, electronic, dispersability etc.), understanding on the strength and nature of noncovalnet interactions to graphene and graphene derivatives etc. The topic is supported by ERC grant.

Nanomaterials for catalytic application
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Radek Zbořil, Ph.D.
Nanomaterials offer a great application potential in catalytic reactions due to the small size and a high fraction of surface atoms enabling to achieve higher rate constants and better selectivity compared to microcrystalline counterparts. Their efficiency would be further enhanced by combination of various nano-species creating so called hybrid or integrated catalysts. The aim of this research topic is the development of such hybrid nanoarchitectures including core-shell nanostructures, magnetically separable catalysts, micro-mesoporous hybrids and N-doped carbon systems and their applications in selected organic, photocatalytic and electrocatalytic reactions.

Hybrid nanostructures for photoelectrochemical water splitting
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Radek Zbořil, Ph.D.
Solar-powered water splitting is a central technology for the realization of a sustainable economy based on clean and renewable energy vectors such as hydrogen (H2). The overall reaction (2H2O → 2H2 + O2) is endothermic (E = 1.23 V vs RHE) and consists of two half reactions: 2H+ + 2e → H2 (HER, E°red = 0.0 V) and 2H2O + 4h<sup+< sup=""> → O2 + 4H+ (OER, E°ox = 1.23 V). Adopted semiconductors should ideally absorb photons with energies higher than 1.23 eV and feature conduction band (ECB) and valence band (EVB) edges that straddleE°red and E°ox, respectively. However, though CB and VB may have appropriate energies, unavoidable potential losses and kinetic overpotentials imply that 1.6–2.4 eV is the actual energy necessary to sustain the overall water splitting. Such a severe thermodynamic and kinetic restriction explains why a semiconductor able to efficiently drive the overall reaction has yet to be identified. Transition metal oxides rarely meet the criteria of an Eg suitable for sunlight activation, or of favorable band edges relative to E°red and E°ox. Thus, the well renowned earth abundant materials potentially stable in the long-term, such as TiO2, α-Fe2O3, WO3, BiVO4, etc. still represent the most viable option for PEC applications. However, the intrinsic limitations of these materials still have to be addressed. There are several viable options to increase the PEC water splitting efficiency including (i) 1D material nanostructuring, to overcome the short hole diffusion length and prevent the photogenerated charge recombination; (ii) engineering of multi-component hybrid nanostructures and (iii) the use of co-catalysts/sensitizers, to enhance structural stability and extend the spectral range of light absorption, pointing to improve the efficiencies in PEC processes. The framework of this PhD program is based on developing a new class of multicomponent hybrid systems composed of a central semiconductor (CS), most likely TiO2, α-Fe2O3, ZnO and WO3, with controlled shape and dimensionality (e.g., 1D-nanotubes, 2D-ultrathin films). The key-approach is represented by the simultaneous and synergistic combination of strategies (nanostructuring, co-catalyst deposition, surface sensitization) usually studied and developed independently. Therefore, the nanostructured CSs will be coupled to counterparts with specific functionalities (extended visible light absorption, remarkable efficiency in charge transfer, enhanced carrier mobility) and the effective interaction of the single components will significantly benefit the PEC efficiency of the composite system.

Catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles and their composites for applications in energy production
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Libor Kvítek, CSc.
Metal based nanomaterials are frequently studied due to number of their unique properties. Mainly their catalytic activity is important in chemical industry, which is primarily associated with a high ratio of atoms or molecules on the surface of the particle to its volume. Current developments in the field of nanotechnologies for energy applications are related directly to this high catalytic activity of nanomaterials. In addition to research aimed at development new power generation systems, either chemically (electrochemical cells) or solar energy conversion, many research teams are also focused on energy conservation in energy-rich compounds. One such reaction that allows the energy to be stored for later use while eliminating some of the unfavorable carbon dioxide emissions is the reduction of this fossil fuel combustion product to produce many organic compounds for reuse in the energy industry or in chemical industry. Carbon dioxide can be reduced by hydrogen to form a series of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds, typically methanol. This reaction uses similar catalysts as well-known Fischer-Tropsch synthesis which proceeds efficiently with the aid of metal-based catalytic systems. Long-term experience in the research of catalytic activity of metal nanomaterials at laboratories of Department of Physical Chemistry UPOL and RCPTM has recently led to the development of an efficient composite nanocatalyst for this reaction based on copper nanoparticles bound to nanostructured iron oxide. The first tests of this catalyst, in collaboration with the catalytic group of Dr. Vajda at Argonne National Laboratory (Chicago, USA), showed high activity of this catalyst for hydrocarbon production. Further research will be carried out using a PID micro-reactor for study of heterogeneous catalysis in gaseous reaction system linked to a GC/MS analytical instrument. The main aim of this PhD thema is focus on the research and development of the catalytic system based on nanoparticles of noble metals combined with iron oxide nanoparticles with high catalytic activity for low-temperature (up to 300 °C) hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to produce energy-rich compounds usable in energetics and chemical industry.

Noncovalent interactions at metallic and non-metallic surfaces: qauntum mechanical study
Supervisor: prof. Ing. Pavel Hobza, DrSc., FRSC
Noncovalent interactions of small and medium-sized molecules on metallic and non-metallic surfaces will be studied by using nonempirical and semiempirical quantum mechanical methods. Besides structure and geometry of complexes formed also total stabilization energy as well as its components will be investigated. Attention will be paid to eletric and magnetic properties of molecules adsorbed and thier complexes with the surfaces. The study will be based on cluster model as well as on infinitive surface model based on periodic boundary conditions.

Theoretical study of charge transport in nanostructures
Supervisor: doc. Ing. Pavel Jelínek, Ph.D.
Nanotechnology is one of the key science disciplines that will fundamentally influence the development of our society. One of the promising directions of nanotechnology is linked to the possibility of charge and spin control on the atomic scale. The possibility of actively controlling atomic-level charge transfer in nanostructures opens up new possibilities in the field of nanoelectronics. A deeper understanding of the processes involved in charge transfer at the atomic level requires new procedures in the field of theoretical simulations.
Within the doctoral study the student will acquire basic theoretical methods for computer simulations of electron and atomic structures of nanostructures on the surface of solid matter. Student will acquire theoretical backgrounds of scanning microscopy and charge transport at atomic level. In particular, he/she will learn the computational methods associated with the theory of functional density and its application to selected problems of the charge transfer in nanostructures.
The aim of the thesis is to study selected problems of description of nanostructures on solid surfaces and their physical and chemical properties using numerical simulations. The calculations will be carried out in close cooperation with experimental measurements. Further development of computer simulations is also envisaged in doctoral studies.

Chemical and physical properties of molecular nanostructures on surfaces investigated by means of scanning probe microscopy
Supervisor: doc. Ing. Pavel Jelínek, Ph.D.
Nanotechnology is one of the key science disciplines that will fundamentally influence the development of our society. The rise of the era of nanotechnology is closely related to the invention of scanning probe microscopy that allow not only achieving atomic resolution on solid state surfaces but also the manipulation of individual atoms or molecules. The current development of scanning probe microscopes makes it possible to perform high-resolution measurements of atomic forces and tunneling currents on individual atoms or molecules on the surface. The possibility of simultaneous measurement of atomic forces and tunneling current opens up entirely new possibilities for characterization of individual molecules or molecular nanostructures on the surface of a solid.
The aim of this work is to master the work with the atomic force microscope and the scanning tunneling microscope working in high vacuum. In the course of the study, he will perform the measurement of the atomic and electron structure of selected molecular complexes on the surface of high-resolution solids. The main goal of this work is the study of selected chemical and physical properties of molecular systems.

Theoretical studies of material properties of molecular nanostructures on solid surfaces
Supervisor: doc. Ing. Pavel Jelínek, Ph.D.
The development of on-surface chemistry and the scanning microscopy allowed significant advances in the ability to form molecular nanostructures on solid surfaces and to characterize their material properties at atomic level. In many cases, these molecular nanostructures exhibit completely new features promising for molecular electronics, nanocatalysis, nanophotonics, etc. However, a deep understanding of new material properties is not possible without computer simulations of the electron and atomic structures of these systems.
The aim of this work is to acquire a theoretical description of the scanning microscopes and the electron structure of molecular nanostructures on the surfaces of solids. Computer simulations of selected molecular complexes on the surface of solids based on functional density theory, including simulations of images of scanning microscopes, will be performed during the study. The theoretical analysis will be carried out in close cooperation with the experimental group, which will allow for a complex picture of the studied processes.

Magnetism of 2D systems
Supervisor: doc. Mgr. Jiří Tuček, Ph.D.
The long-term challenge of the scientific community is to develop metal-free magnetic systems based on carbon. However, so far, magnetism self-sustainable at higher temperatures (up to room temperature) has not been reported for any sp-based material including all carbon allotropes. The most promising results have been achieved with 2D graphene and its derivatives, which would exhibit low-temperature magnetism after appropriate chemical treatment. Among carbon nanoallotropes, graphene has been identified as the most promising candidate to show interesting self-sustainable magnetic features once defects are introduced. The defects include local topology perturbations, vacancies, non-carbon atoms in the graphene lattice, adatoms (i.e., atoms added to the surface of the graphene sheet), mixed sp2/sp3 hybridization (i.e., suitable sp2/sp3 ratio), and zigzag-type edges (i.e., confinement-related phenomena). The imprinting of self-sustainable magnetism at room temperature to graphene and/or its derivatives is widely recognized as a key challenge for the further development of 2D carbon-based materials with a huge potential in spintronics devices, biomedicine, environmental technologies etc. The goal of this PhD topic is viewed in finding, both experimentally and theoretically, the optimal combination of defects of various natures towards generation of magnetic centers, promotion of their communication and, at the same time, preservation of the role of conduction electrons. The issue of imprinting self-sustainable magnetism will be also addressed for systems analogous to graphene such as MoS2, WS2, etc.

Advanced Nanomaterials: Synthesis and Applications in Catalysis, Organic Transformations, Photo (electro) catalysis
Supervisor: doc. Manoj B. Gawande, Ph.D.
Nanoparticles are regarded as attractive candidates for heterogeneous catalysis in various imperative catalytic processes as they are now easy to synthesize with a desired size, structure, morphology and composition. Keeping in mind the current environmental sustainability concerns, it is important to design inexpensive and benign nanocatalysts for organic transformations/catalytic processess. Over the last decade, a variety of new types of nanocatalysts have been investigated, including well-defined Morphology Depdendent Catalysts, Single-atom catalysts, Core–shell and yolk–shell nanocatalysts, Silica-based hybrid catalysts, 2D graphene-based materials and 2D single metal or mixed metal ionic nanocatalysts. The ascent of these complex nanomaterials over the last few years has enabled chemists to understand traditional catalysts from a new perspective. The aim of these hot research areas is to desinged the materials based on highly important targated catalytic, organic transformations and Photo (electro) catalysis applications.

Design of novel hybrid functional Graphene@Metal-Organic hybrid porous Materials for energy and environmental applications
Supervisor: Dr. Jayaramulu Kolleboyina
Inorganic-organic hybrid porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as promising materials for various environmental applications because of their unique textural properties. 
Despite of these beneficial properties, most of MOFs hindered by limitations as physical, chemical and mechanical stabilities, meso pores and pore conductivity, leading to poor performance mainly in energy applications. Nevertheless, a significant amount of research of recent progress in producing for practical applications for MOFs can be attributed to the controllable integration of MOFs with other functional materials. These new MOF hybrids have been successfully obtained through MOF integration of with metal-nanoparticles, polyoxometalates (POMs) quantum dots, polymers, enzymes, functionalized silica, enzyme and carbonaceous based materials. Studies have shown that MOF hybrids exhibits improved performance, compared to sum of the individual parts towards desired applications.  Among various hybrid materials, graphene-based MOF materials is attracting considerable research attention owing to its excellent collaborative functional properties of enhanced stabilities, conductivity and hierarchical (micro/meso) pores. In this proposal, we want to incorporate covalent/noncovalent approached to grow MOF nanoparticles on functional graphene materials (on basal plane) using various approaches like seed-mediated, layer by layer, self-assembly and direct mixing for energy and environmental applications

Self-organized biopolymer layers and coatings with mineral fillers for special application
Supervisor: Prof. Ing. L. Lapčík, Ph.D.
The aim of this PhD. project is to in detail understand and quantify processes of self-organization of gel polymer layers filled with nano/micro inorganic fillers particles with specific properties suitable for absorption of microwave energy. Research work will be focused on preparation of the latter systems, mechanism of their solidification with respect to their final functional application, study of the pathways of their possible preparation and processing in technical praxis.
There will be performed in detail characterization of their microstructure and macrostructural ordering (SEM, HR TEM, TEM, AFM), effect of the processing technology, surface treatment (physical plasma, chemical crosslinking) and composition on final physico-chemical (structural, spectral (FTIR, UV VIS, wetting properties, SEA)) and material properties (mechanical (tensile testing, swelling), electrical (DRS), wetting, thermal (TG DTG, DSC, DMA)).
In the theoretical area, the aim is gaining of new knowledge on mutual interaction of nano/micro structure and 3D hierarchy of layers, with respect to the selected physical properties. From the practical point of view, the aim is broadening of the knowledge and experience of the research staff of the department and the students, with the processes affecting creation and ordering of the multidimensional structures. Quantification of the latter processes on particular fillers particles interface and the matrix.

Nanomaterials for biological applications
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Aleš Panáček, Ph.D.
Nanostructured materials are considered as unique materials thanks to their specific physical and chemical properties resulting in specific interactions with living matter. Biological applications of nanostructured materials are wide and they can be used in various areas, for example in medicine for diagnostics and treatments of disorders. Bioactive nanostructured materials can also be applied in industrial and environmental applications for elimination of biological, especialy microbial, contaminations. For example, silver nanoparticles exhibit strong bactericidal activity which can be used in a treatment of microbial infections including those caused by bacteria highly- and multi-resistant to antibiotics. On the other hand it must be paid attention to possible adverse effects of nanostructured materials to living matters as a result of their specific interactions with biological systems. Research on interaction mechanisms of nanostructured materials with biological systems at different cellular levels and their usage for biological and medical applications represents very interesting scientific field.

Computer Science

Field of Study Computer Science

Relational data analysis
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Radim Bělohlávek, DSc.
The goal is to develop new methods and algorithms for relational data analysis,particularly for discovery of clusters a concepts in data, dependencies in data, factorization and dimensionality reduction of data. This also involves exploration of time complexity of selected problems and proposed algorithms, and testing of the methods and algorithms on data.

Computational and state complexity of properties of discrete event systems
Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Radim Bělohlávek, DSc.
The aim of this thesis is to study the computational and state complexity of discrete event systems and of the operations used in supervisory control of discrete event systems. The systems under investigation can be modeled by different formalisms, such as automata or Petri nets. The investigation will focus on the complexity of general properties as well as on the conditions under which an efficient complexity can be obtained. 

Verification problems: algorithms, complexity, experiments
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Petr Jančar, CSc.
In the area of automated verification of behavioural properties of (software and hardware) systems there are various problems whose computational complexity has not been sufficiently clarified so far. The aim of proposing this topic is to attract a student to this area,possibly within a running project of the Czech Grant Agency; the research effort can be directed at a theoretical and/or an experimental part.

Structure of minimal theories in non-classic logics and their fragments
Supervisor: doc. RNDr. Vilém Vychodil, Ph.D.
The aim is to characterize minimal sets of formulas in languages of non-classic logics in terms of properties of their models. The goal is to extend existing results of characterizations of minimality and make their generalizations for larger families of non-classic logics and fragments of their languages. The research may also include the design and analysis of algorithms that arise in this context. The applicant is assumed to be familiar with mathematical logic and computer programming.

Mathematics

Field of Study Algebra and Geometry

Aggregation operators on lattices and posets
Supervisor: Prof. Mgr. Radomír Halaš Dr.

Special diffeomorphisms of differentiable manifolds
Supervisor:
Prof. RNDr. Josef Mikeš DrSc.

Residuated structures
Supervisor: Doc. Mgr. Michal Botur Ph.D.

Divisible residuated po-monoids and their subreducts
Supervisor: Doc. RNDr. Jan Kühr Ph.D.

Field of Study Mathematical Analysis

Analysis of equilibria
Supervisor: Prof. RNDr. dr hab. Jan Andres, DSc.
Nonlinear and multivalued analysis of equilibria will be considered to dynamical systems and differential inclusions. Standard well known equilibria are, for instance those of Nash in the frame of the game theory. Using the fractional and topological methods (degree arguments, or so), the existence, localization, multiplicity and stability results will be of an interest.

Multivalued boundary value problems
Supervisor: Prof. RNDr. dr hab. Jan Andres, DSc.
Boundary value problems for the second-order differential inclusions with Neumann boundary conditions will be under consideration. The applied technique will be based on a combination of topological (e.g. degree) arguments and Lyapunov-type bounding functions. The existence, localization and multiplicity results will be of an interest.

Almost-periodic sequences
Supervisor: Prof. RNDr. dr hab. Jan Andres, DSc.
The hierarchy of almost-periodic sequences will be investigated in various metrics. The existence of almost-periodic solutions will be then considered. In the particular case of limit-periodic solutions, the difference equations will be preferably explored in the absence of global lipschitzianity imposed on the right-hand sides.

What to do before applying for Ph.D. study

  1. Choose your field of study and thesis topic.
  2. Contact your potential supervisor and get the endorsement for your application. Only then you can apply for your application!
  3. Some documents are necessary for application - see below Applications & Deadlines.
  4. Complete our electronic application. Choose only fields of study with English titles.
  5. In order to complete the e-application, you will be asked to pay processing fee 690 Kč (approximately 27 EUR) by credit card. More information in Applications & Deadlines.
    Without the payment, the application will not be considered.
  6. Be aware that tution fee 4000 EUR per academic year is required, however there are several Fischer scholarships (below) for selected topics.

Applications & Deadlines

Applicants for master’s study and doctoral´s programmes conducted in English must fill in an online application.

Application deadline for academic year 2019/2020 is 30 April 2019.

Processing fee 690 CZK (approximately 27 EUR) pay by credit card in your electronic application.
You can also pay to following account:
Bank name: Komercni banka, Olomouc
SWIFT: KOMB-CZ-PP
Account number - IBAN: CZ0901000000191096330227
Account holder: Univerzita Palackeho v Olomouci, Krizkovskeho 8, 771 11 Olomouc
Payment description: your name, FS-PAPL
Reference No.: 3900
A transcript of the bank transfer must accompany the application.
Without the payment, the application will not be considered.

Documents Required for Application

These documents attach to your electronic application (in pdf):

  1. Official transcript and a copy of your certificate/diploma. Should be requested from the colleges and universities attended. For applicants from non-member states of the Hague Conference on International Law (see the list), the documents must be accompanied by an apostille issued by the local Czech Embassy.
  2. Two recommendation letters. These provide an additional source of information about professional and academic level and should be completed by employer or university professor.
  3. Curriculum vitae. Information concerning your life, education, including work, study and research experience. Statement of academic goal indicating why you wish to study in a particular program. Ph.D. applicants are expected to submit a description of their graduate program, diploma thesis, published papers, honours awarded, membership in scientific societies and personal professional goals.
  4. English language proficiency certificate.
  5. Health status certificate (not older than one month). All accepted international students are required to join International Student Medical Expense Plan or show a proof of equivalent coverage of their health insurance.
  6. Diploma recognition

Scholarships

Fischer scholarship for International Students at the Faculty of Science

J. L. Fischer
The Faculty of Science now wishes to invite applicants for the Fischer Ph.D. scholarship to support International scholars. The scholarship is open for 10 outstanding international students in the field of Mathematical Analysis, Algebra and Geometry, Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, Geological Science, Geoinformatics and Cartography, International Development Studies, Biochemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Molecular and Cell Biology, Experimental Biology, Zoology, Applied Physics, Biophysics, Optics and Optoelectronics. The scholarship is available for up to 48 months.

Scholarship Description:

  • Application Deadline: April 30, 2019.
  • Course Level: The scholarship is offered to full-time students for pursuing the Ph.D. program.
  • Scholarship Award: The Faculty of Science grants 11 000 EUR per academic year (25 000 CZK/month).
  • Nationality: International.
  • Number of Scholarships: up to 10 scholarships to support International Scholars.
  • Tuition: depends on the program and could be from 1 700 EUR - 4 000 EUR.
  • On-campus an exclusive single room accommodations for Ph.D. students (accommodation type is based on availability).

All the above items are covered for up to 48 months based on satisfactory progression.

Eligible Countries:

  • This scholarship is open to applicants of all nationalities.

Entrance Requirements:

  • Applicants must have a Master's Degree in a similar field of study and meet the required English language proficiency for the relevant subject area.

Application Procedure:

  • The Applicant is strongly advised to contact the perspective supervisor.
  • Applicants must submit only online applications with uploaded documents.
  • Documents include: request for the Fischer scholarship, certified copy of Diploma and Transcript of Records, a recommendation letter by an employer or a university professor which should provide an additional source of information about the professional and academic level, curriculum vitae and English language proficiency certificate.
  • In the case of the scholarship the interview is mandatory. The interview can be held through a video call and the Vice-Dean must be present.
  • All accepted international students are required to join the International Student Medical Expense Plan or show a proof of equivalent coverage of their health insurance.
  • Diploma must be recognized.
  • The application fee is 690 CZK (non-refundable).

Short-term Courses

Most departments at the Faculty of Science offer courses for foreign students in English. These courses are not exclusively intended for foreigners, exchange students will study alongside Czech students. In case of successful completion of a course, students are awarded ECTS credits. These credits allocated to each course should describe the approximate student workload required to complete them. 30 ECTS credits per semester (4-6 courses) are considered to be the regular workload for an exchange student. After choosing a specific field of study Exchange students may browse the list of courses according to a department or a semester. In case you need more information about study opportunities at the faculty, please contact dana.gronychova@upol.cz.

Mathematics and Computer Science

Winter Semester

KAG/ALG2DAlgebra 1
KAG/KGEO2Geometry 2
KMA/NLPNonlinear Programming
KMA/NM1MNumerical Methods 1
KMA/ODR2Ordinary Differential Equations 2
KMA/PDR2Partial Differential Equations 2
KMA/PSMPsychometrics
KMA/TVOPShape Optimization
KMI/ALS3Algorithms and Complexity 3
KMI/FUZFuzzy Sets
KMI/KRYCryptography
KMI/LGPRLogic Programming
KMI/NLONon-Classical Logics
KMI/TIKInformation Theory and Coding
VCJ/CFFCzech for Foreigners

Summer Semester

KAG/KMA4Mathematical Analysis 4
KAG/ALG4Algebra 4
KMA/BIOMBiometry
KMA/DS1MDynamical Systems 1
KMA/DS2Dynamical Systems 2
KMA/KSComplex Systems
KMA/MMRMathematical Methods of Decision Making
KMA/MRMarkov Chains
KMA/NDRNonlinear Differential Equations
KMA/NEMNonparametric Methods
KMA/NM2Numerical Methods 2
KMA/NMOMNumerical Methods of Optimization
KMA/ODR3Ordinary Differential Equations 3
KMA/PDR1Partial Differential Equations 1
KMA/SKKStatistical Quality Control
KMA/VMVariational Methods
KMI/FKAFormal Concept Analysis
KMI/KOMData Compression
VCJ/CFFCzech for Foreigners

Physics

Winter Semester

OPT/FLSelected Chapters from Laser Physics
OPT/KKZI1Quantum Communication and Information Processing 1
OPT/KOKTConceptual Issues of Quantum Theory
OPT/QE1Quantum Electrodynamics 1
OPT/SYNNonlinear Dynamics, Chaos, and Synergetics
OPT/TSFThermodynamics and Statistical Physics
KBF/FOSYPhotosynthesis and Stress
KBF/EMElectron Microscopy
KBF/HRSVoice, Speech and Hearing
KBF/MBMMolecular Biology of Mutagens, Carcinogens and Cytostatics
KEF/BBIOBionanotechnology
KEF/BEMNExperimental Methods of Nanomaterials
KEF/ENVFEnvironmental Physics
KEF/FZNPhysical Basis of Nanotechnologies
KEF/PRNANNanotechnology Practice
KEF/TMNFundamentals of Mechanics
KEF/TSII1Theory of Signals and Information 1
SLO/BOVNOptical Properties of Nanostructures
SLO/BZDFSources and Detectors for Nanophotonics
SLO/ELNOExperimental Laser and Nonlinear Optics
SLO/NMF1Numerical Methods for Physicists 1
SLO/OEFOptics for Experimental Physicists
SLO/PLTProgramming of Laboratory Devices
SLO/PROG1Computer Programming and Numerical Methods
SLO/USMECIntroduction to the Standard Model of Elementary Particles
VCJ/CFFCzech for Foreigners

Summer Semester

OPT/IZLFundamentals of Laser Physics
OPT/KKZI2Quantum Ccommunication and Information Processing 2
OPT/KTIQuantum Information Theory
OPT/QE2Quantum Electrodynamics 2
OPT/QS1Coherence and Statistical Optics
KBF/BISBiological Experiments in silico
KBF/VRBFree Radicals in Biology and Biomedicine
KEF/ČMSA1Digital Measuring Systems 1
KEF/TRTheory of Relativity
KEF/TSII2Theory of Signals and Information 2
KEF/VIJFVirtual Instrumentation in Nuclear Physics
SLO/DFCVKDetectors in Particle Physic
SLO/LTP1Laser Technologies in Practice
SLO/NMF2Numerical Methods for Physicists 2
SLO/OVPLOptical Properties of Solid Materials
SLO/PROG2Programming in C Language for Physicists
VCJ/CFFCzech for Foreigners

Chemistry

Winter Semester

ACH/AACZPAnalytical Applications in Environmental Chemistry
ACH/AHSApplication of Mass Spectrometry
ACH/HSBMass Spectrometry of Biopolymers
ACH/PHSMass Spectrometry
ACH/RLEResearch Laboratory Experiments
ACH/UAOSAnalysis of Organic Compounds
AFC/FCHMPhysico-Chemical Methods of Study of Substances
AFC/SMVLSpectral and Magnetic Properties of Matter
CRH/BRBBioimaging of Plant Cells
CRH/MITModern Techniques of Immunofluorescence
KBC/MBIOGMolecular Biology
KFC/ADDAdvanced Rational Drug Design
KFC/ELCElectrochemistry
KFC/FFPhotochemistry and Photoelectrochemistry
KFC/MOMMolecular Modelling
KFC/MOMATModeling of Materials and Nanomaterials
KFC/MSRMMethods of Study of Reaction Mechanisms
KFC/MVMMechanicals Properties of Materials
KFC/NEKNoncovalent Interactions
KFC/NNM1Nanomaterials 1
KFC/PFCHAdvanced Lectures in Physical Chemistry
KFC/QCHQuantum Chemistry
KFC/RKPFSolid Phase Reaction Kinetics
KFC/SPStudy of Surface
KFC/SPM1Spectroscopic Methods 1
KFC/SSMSeminar in Spectroscopic Method
KFC/STBIStructural Bioinformatics
KFC/STDStatistical Thermodynamics
OCH/CNAChemistry of Nucleic Acids
OCH/OOSOrganometallics in Organic Synthesis
VCJ/CFFCzech for Foreigners

Summer Semester

ACH/MTACMicrotechniques in Analytical Chemistry
ACH/RLEResearch Laboratory Experiments
AFC/MGCHMagnetochemistry
AFC/SABBiomacromolecules Structural Analysis
CRH/BSBStress Biology and Biotechnology
CRH/BTIBiotechnological and Biochemical Information
CRH/CSCytoskeleton and Signalling
KFC/BFCHBiophysical Chemistry
KFC/HSHeterogenous Systems
KFC/MAMAMagnetism of Materials
KFC/MSKXMethods of Study of Colloid Systems
KFC/NNM2Nanomaterials 2
KFC/RTGMX-ray Methods for Characterization of Nanomaterials
KFC/SPM2Spectroscopic Methods 2
KFC/VVLMethods for Study of Surface Tension and Viscoelasticity of Matherials
OCH/CNAChemistry of Nucleic Acids
OCH/OOSOrganometallics in Organic Synthesis
VCJ/CFFCzech for Foreigners

Biology

Winter Semester

BOT/FTGSBPlant Geography
BOT/GMEGeneral Mycology in English Language
LRR/VORFPersons of Consequence in Plant Physiology
VCJ/CFFCzech for Foreigners

Summer Semester

BOT/ZFPBasics of Phytopathology
LRR/MBRMolecular Biology of Plants
VCJ/CFFCzech for Foreigners

Geosciences

Winter Semester

KGE/GKQuaternary Geology
KGE/MSMethods in Stratigraphy
KGE/PRGCRIntroduction to Geology of the Czech Republic
KGE/SEDGSedimentology
KGE/VCLHuman Evolution
KGG/QCLICGeography of Climate Change
KGG/QCZRGeography of the Czech Republic
KGG/QCRCWConflict Regions of the Contemporary World
KGG/QGIGGIScience for Geographers
KGG/QBALRegional Geography of the Balkans
KGG/QORGeographically Oriented Research
KGG/QRISRegional Information Systems
KGG/QRSPRemote Sensing Principles
KGG/QRGCESeminar in Regional Geography of Central Europe
KGI/ATKARAtlas Cartography
KGI/DAPRZRemote Sensing
KGI/DIMORDigital Elevation Models
KGI/GIGeoinformatics
KGI/GINEWNew Issues of Geosciences
KGI/GSOCGeoinformatics in Socio-economic Geography
KGI/KADESCartographic Design and Prepress Processing
KGI/KOKARCognitive Cartography
KGI/SEGE2Socio-economic Geography 2
VCJ/CFFCzech for Foreigners

Summer Semester

KGE/EMIEnvironmental Mineralogy
KGE/IHMIntroduction to Hydrogeochemical Modeling
KGE/LEGOMedical Geology
KGE/VCMKEvolution of Man and his Material Civilization
KGG/QCLICGeography of Climate Change
KGG/QCRCWConflict Regions of the Contemporary World
KGG/QCZRGeography of the Czech Republic
KGG/QGIGGIScience for Geographers
KGG/QKGEXGeographical Field Trip in the Czech Republic
KGG/QBALRegional Geography of the Balkans
KGG/QORGeographically Oriented Research
KGG/QRISRegional Information Systems
KGG/QRGCESeminar in Regional Geography of Central Europe
KGG/QTECTerrain Climatology
KGG/QZGEXGeographical Field Trip to a Foreign Country
KGI/GIGeoinformatics
KGI/GINEWNew Issues of Geosciences
KGI/GISGeographical Information Systems
KGI/ISUZLand Information Systems
KGI/KART2Cartography 2
KGI/PRG2Programming 2
KGI/TRIDTechnologies in Geographic Information Science
KGI/VYPOKAdvanced Computational Methods in Cartography
KGI/WEKARWeb Cartography
VCJ/CFFCzech for Foreigners

Development Studies

Winter Semester

MRS/XPCKProject Cycle Management
MRS/XPGPPolitico-geographical Processes in the Developing World
MRS/XDVTDevelopment Theories
MRS/XDVADevelopment Assistance
MRS/XDVGDevelopment Geography and Globalization
MRS/XGDAFGeography and Development of Africa and Middle East
MRS/XGDCAGeography and Development of Central Asia and Caucasus
MRS/XGEPGlobal Environmental Issues
MRS/XQLMQualitative Methods in Development
MRS/XQNMQuantitative Methods in Development
KSK/SADSport and Development
VCJ/CFFCzech for Foreigners

Summer Semester

MRS/XCDPCommunity Development and Participation
MRS/XDVEDevelopment Economics
MRS/XENGEnvironmental Geography
MRS/XEVOEvaluation of Development Projects
MRS/XPURSustainable Development
MRS/XGDLADevelopment Opportunities: Latin America
MRS/XNFMNegotiation, Facilitation, Mediation
MRS/XGDSADevelopment Opportunities: South and South-East Asia
VCJ/CFFCzech for Foreigners

Summer Schools

Summer School on Development Cooperation (Department of Development and Environmental Studies)

Contacts

Faculty of Science, Palacký University Olomouc

Study Department
17. listopadu 1192/12
771 46 Olomouc
tel.: +420 585 634 010-14
fax: +420 585 225 737
e-mail: studijni.prf@upol.cz

Contact person for foreign students:

Dana Gronychová
dana.gronychova@upol.cz
+420 585 634 058

Room number: 1.005, ground floor next to the reception